Tagged: Brett Wallace

The Overbay Saga: Black or Red?

The ‘L’ word is contentious issue among Blue Jay fans.  Blue Jay first baseman, Lyle Overbay, was a player highly scrutinized in Toronto well before this season.  Now, Overbay is off to a horrid start hitting .127 AVG, with 0 HR’s and only 4 RBI’s.  If you go to some of the daily Blue Jay blogs you will find an ‘all out war’ going on between fans with different opinions on Overbay‘s value.  Who knew baseball could resemble war?  Seems like the furthest thing from war to me?  For Jay fans, Lyle Overbay is the Gaza Strip.     

In short, the debate stems from Overbay’s ability to play great defense and contribute an above average .OBP (on base percentage) – stats that go relatively unnoticed by casual fans that put high expectations on a first basemen in the catergories of HRs, RBIs and AVG.  Overbay’s contribution, or lack there of, is the main dispute.  Many Jays fan want him out of the lineup, where some believe him to be a key contributor getting on base and playing stellar defense. 

I can’t think of a Blue Jay that has been more disputed, criticized and argued more than Lyle Overbay.  If you listen to local sports talk radio after Jay games, you will hear a guy named Mike Wilner defend Lyle Overbay on a religious basis.  The day Overbay moves on, Wilner will likely feel an empty void in his life.  He has preached the Gospel of Overbay for so many years that Lyle must possess some kind of omnipotence in his mind.  I enjoy Wilner on the radio, so I hope he doesn’t have a nervous breakdown when Overbay is gone. 

Any baseball player, as we learned from the book/movie in pre-production starring Brad Pitt and Jonah Hill ‘Moneyball,’ players can be seen as financial commodities.  With Overbay it has been hard to tell if we were in the black or the red?  It is hard to compare him to other first basemen because he not like the others.  Overbay begun his contract with the Jays in fine fashion, but is now ending it in with a less-than-mediocre performance.  Are the Jays in the black or the red with Overbay?  Answer that question, but be prepared for war!

LyleO.jpg

 The Future of Lyle Overbay

In all likelihood, Lyle looks take a pay cut upon receiving a new
free agent contract. Making 7.95 million for the 2010 season, Overbay
has not lived up to the high expectations placed upon following the
first year of his contract in 2006. For that year, Overbay hit for a
.312 average, had 22 homeruns, drove in close to 100 RBI’s, had .OBP of
.372 and knocked his signature 46 doubles. However, for the next 3
years of his current 5-year-contract, Overbay’s homerun numbers dipped
into the teens, his RBI’s fell into the 60’s and those signature
doubles became merely average falling to the low-to-mid 30’s.

When Overbay was with Milwaukee, there was a year he hit an
astonishing 56 doubles in a season. This season led to a lucrative
contract with the Blue Jays; however, throughout the course of that
contract it became apparent those days were over.

Considering the numbers previously mentioned for past three years.
One wonders how Overbay was even able to survive at first base for the
in the A.L. East? He plays in a division where Mark Teixeira, Jason
Giambi, Kevin Youkilus, David Ortiz, Carlos Pena and Aubrey Huff
have
consistently put up ‘bigtime’ production numbers at the first base
position for their respective teams.

In the past three years Overbay’s production has dropped off. This is
usually an alarming fact for a first baseman. However, it is not as
grim as those numbers may suggest. Overbay is consistent contributor
defensively at first base. He is one of the best. Also, throughout
those years Overbay has maintained the same high .OBP (On Base
Percentage) that he had in his ‘breakthrough’ years. More and more,
teams are desiring players with high .OBPs. So, Overbay’s value has not completely
fallen off the map. I’d say that his value on the open market would be 2-3
million per year and only he’d get, at most, 3 years. Good, but a great
decline from the 7.95 million that he will make in 2010.

Overbay will be an intriguing player to look at during this upcoming
free agency because he is unique from other first basemen. How many
first basemen do you see that are purely solid .OBP guys? Don’t you
have be able to ‘mash’ to play first base? Does any team really want a
first baseman that is just good at getting on base and playing defense?

Overbay’s Future

Jays

It seems that Lyle Overbay will not be in the Blue Jays plans for
2011. The Jays have traded for top first base prospect, Brett Wallace,
and they will likely work him into the position – possibly as early as
this season. The Jays have also been incrementally reducing payroll
while allotting most of their assets into scouting and player
development.

The Possible Frontrunners

A’s

Having a high .OBP, and contributing on defense, Overbay would ideally
fit into Oakland General Manager Billy Beane’s ‘Moneyball’ philosophy.
Taking a sharp pay cut, Beane might want to exploit Overbay before he
passes the age of 35. At which point, Beane would hope that Overbay
increases his trade-market value for available prospects. Too many
obstacles abound in considering Overbay being signed by Oakland,
though. Top prospect Chris C. Carter might need to be held in the
minors a bit longer and Oakland’s experiment with AAA ‘mashers’ Jake Fox and Daric Barton
will need to fail. I’d only consider the A’s a secondary option for
Overbay in consideration of these factors.

Rays

Considering where a free agent might sign it is necessary to look at
primarily look at two things in terms of ‘team needs.’ One, what free
agents will the team possibly lose? And what players might be coming up
through the team’s system? The Tampa Bay Rays will face a dilemma with
both Carl Crawford and Carlos Pena‘s contracts coming up for renewal in
2011. If Tampa commits to signing Crawford for ‘big money,’ then Pena
will likely be out on the market. The Rays currently have an
interesting 19-year-old first baseman in there system, 5th round-pick
Jeff Malm, but he would be at least 3 years away from the major
leagues. Overbay would be an effective, cheap and solid ‘stopgap’
option for Rays that can add depth and defense. Being a small-market
team, I can see the going after Overbay, especially if the Rays choose
to commit to Crawford instead of Pena.

Mets

The Mets are team in need of first base help. They have a converted
outfielder playing the position now, and their system does not look
bright in the area of first basemen. If Daniel Murphy and prospect Ike
Davis
do not contribute effectively, the Mets will need help. Overbay
would fill a void for them, and with the amount money they’ve spent
recently on Bay, Perez, K-Rod and Santana they might go with him as an
affordable option if they are not in sweepstakes to acquire a player
like Carlos Pena.

Mariners (my pick!)

Lyle Overbay is a product of the State of Washington. In the past, he
has been rumoured to be headed back to his home state via a trade to
the Mariners. He has been quoted, saying that he would like to play
there. With Ken Griffey Jr. edging on retirement, the M’s might want to
move first baseman Casey Kochman over to DH for 2011, making room for
top 1B/OF prospect Dustin Ackley (depending on his progression), or a
‘stopgap’ option like free agent Lyle Overbay to fill in until Ackley
is ready. Having first base solidified on an exciting M’s team might be
desirable? The chance of Overbay playing for the M’s improves even
greater if Kotchman shows the same downturn in his statistics from last
season. Overbay could be considered in a deadline trade to the
‘predictably contending Mariners’ if Kochman’s stats continue to
decline. The Jays will likely be in the cellar of the A.L. East again,
and they will be looking for prospects to keep building their team. A
deadline trade to the M’s makes the signing of Overbay even more
likely. In any case, they will be at least rumored in
signing Overbay next offseason, in my opinion.

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Keys to the Season: What they are saying? What I am saying?

The Blue Jays enter 2010 depleted of some depth.  We traded our only front-end starter (Roy Halladay), let our best defense outfielder walk away (Alex Rios) and also traded our best defensive infielder (Scott Rolen). 
The analysts don’t see the Jays getting any better any time soon.  That
said, it is hard to get worse than the 75-87 record that saw the Jays
finish, once again, 4th place in the highly competitive A.L. East. 

The only thing that could be worse is the Jays finishing behind the Baltimore Orioles
for dead last in the A.L. East.  This is where most believe
the Jays are headed, as Baltimore seems to be going upward in the
standings with an array of emeging young players.  Some even go further
to say that the Jays are going to be the worst team in the American
League.  Hello Kansas City Royals!  I’m not about to go nearly that far, but I do believe the Jays 2010 success is contingent on some key factors. 

Every year I look forward to reading the Baseball Prospectus write-up that forcasts the Blue Jays future.  Similar many other baseball fans, I use the intelligence and effort put into Baseball Prospectus
to supplant my own personal lack of baseball intelligence. 
They do amazing work!  More to their credit, they were dead on with
pin-pointing the downfall of J.P. Ricciardi in previous years. 
Primarily, they critiqued Ricciardi’s string of questionable signings that
started with Cory Koskie and his low-risk, low-reward college draft
picks that produced a few good talents, but ended up depleting our farm
system as a whole.

For this season, Baseball Prospectus has pretty much agreed with
other publications saying that 2010 has been “clearly surrendered to
rebuilding’ with the signing of ‘stopgap’ players like John Buck and Alex Gonzolez.” 
They also state the obvious by very briefly saying “trading the Doc
hurts, and the Jays will be in a tough battle to be ahead of the
Orioles all year.”  What they are enthused about is the prospects of Hill, Lind,
Snider and the Walrus (Brett Wallace) all playing together at some point
this year, calling them the ‘Fab Four.’ 

I’m liking this ‘Fab Four’ analogy … a lot!   So, I’m going with it as my number 1 ‘key to the season’ for the Blue Jays:

Keys to the Season

1. The Fab Four  

It would be very nice to bank on repeat seasons from Adam Lind and Aaron Hill.  If it doesn’t happen, then Baseball Prospectus
has entertained the notion of trading Aaron Hill at peak value to
further establish the Jay’s committment to rebuilding.  Anthopolous
doesn’t seem headed that wa -, but it might be an idea? 
Hill and Lind anchored our lineup last year. The Jays would not have won 70
games without them.  For 2010 we need to count on their bats have to be back in full
effect.  They are both a key component to our team now.  They now have to show that the team can rely on them.  

It will key to get help from guys like Brett Wallace/Lyle Overbay and Travis Snider providing more support near the back of the order.  Going back to Baseball Prospectus, our home park (the Rogers Centre) statistically favors left-handed power hitters.  Last year Jays radio analyst and former player, Alan Ashby,
stated that what really contributed to the Jays 1st place dominance in
April and May was one man – Travis Snider.  Snider started the season giving the
Jays a great power element before totally tapering off in May.  He was a
nice surprise for a team that could use ‘nice surprises.’  This season the Jays could
potentially get another surprise in Brett Wallace.  Anthopolous acquired his
coveted left-handed power bat as a part of the Roy Halladay trade.  The Jays hope that Wallace will be the future, as Lyle Overbay
enters the last year of his contract.  Overbay suffered a
knee contusion last week in Spring Training, so the prospects of
Wallace in 2010 look more possible.  If Snider and Wallace can somehow
find their way into the lineup and produce at expected levels for the
kinds of prospects that they are?  The Jays will have a pair of surprise
‘left-handed’ power bats to compliment Lind and our home ballpark.  Brett
Wallace didn’t have a very good spring, so the Jays will look to
rejuvenate Lyle Overbay for their left-handed production in 2010.  Granted that Overbay’s knee contusion doesn’t become
serious.  These guys all have to produce for the Jays to compete with the potent lineups of New York, Boston, Tampa and now Baltimore.  

2.  Leading the Way on the Mound

The absence of Halladay in the Jays rotation leaves the question:  What starting pitching
talent(s) will emerge?  It would be nice to see multiple guys have
success.  For the Jays to have hope of doing anything this season, they
need some pitchers step up and make a name for themselves.  The likely
candidates are Shaun Marcum and Ricky Romero.  Romero is
coming off a fine rookie year going 13-9.  At one point in the season,
some Yankees writers compared Romero’s stuff, notably his changeup, to Mets ace Johan Santana
That may be a bit strong as Romero struggled at times – compiling an ugly
WHIP of 1.52.  He will need to do better than that to lead the Jays
pitching staff, but he is still learning.

I was really looking forward to watching Shaun Marcum in the Jays
rotation last season.  He came off an impressive 2008 only to be sidelined in 2009.  At times, the way Marcum changed speeds and commanded
the strikezone makes, he was unhittable against weaker hitting clubs.  He seems
to have a great pitching IQ.  I like that Marcum always looks
like he is in control on the mound – something that he probably
learned from Roy Halladay.  Having Marcum back will be an asset that
the Jays didn’t have last season.  Although, coming off an injury, that
will hard count on.  The Jays making the Marcum the #1 opening day
starter is good sign that he will be one ‘key’ to watch in 2010!

As for the rest of our staff, the Jays look to be going with three of Brian Tallet, Marc Rzyepcynski, Brandon Morrow or Dana Eveland.

Eveland had a very strong spring that propelled him into the mix.  It is hard to tell how he will fair with the Jays, but he has certainly opened some eyes this spring.  He might be the most unlikely candidate to lead the staff, but these kind of players sometimes emerge.  Look at Ben Zobrist last year?  

The Jays gave up an intriguing young pitching prospect, Yohermyn Chavez and hard-throwing reliever Brandon League to get Brandon Morrow.  Baseball Prospectus
called Morrow “an odd decision” since the Jays don’t look to be
contending anytime soon.  I don’t agree with this because at age 25, Morrow is still young – making him a possible factor in the Jays rebuilding project.  He is the kind of
player where the Jays are expecting the worse, and hoping for the
best.  I’d say Morrow is ‘big key’ to this season because he could be
due for a breakout year capitalizing on his chance to start full-time.  If Anthopolous hit a homerun with this trade, 2010 could be very promising! 

Brian Tallet pitched very well for the Jays filling in rotation spots last year.  He
has the most experience of the bunch and is a solid option.  However, I don’t
expect him to ‘breakout’ year in 2010.  I’d catergorize Marc Rzyepcynski
the same way.  Zippy (as I call him) is very advanced for his age.  He has four good pitches that he can command, but they don’t overwhelm batters.  Both these guys are solid optionsm, but without a very high-ceiling.

If the Jays want to do something this year then having Kyle Drabek and Brett Cecil
emerge is key!  Cecil overstepped his bounds getting some early
‘big-league’ experience when he should have been in the minors.  Cecil
brings a great arm and a somewhat deceptive left-handed delivery. 
Cecil’s development is not quite there, but in my opinion he has the makings of a front-line
starter.  He will start this year in AAA and look to bounce back into
the rotation at some point this year.  Kyle Drabek has had a very
impressive Spring Training.  Drabek is now being considered for the
rotation earlier than we expected.  Not having actually seen him pitch, I
hear he has a very effective, well-controled curveball that is featured
along with some other great pitching tools.  Jays fans can barely hold
their excitement on him.  I know better than the rely on a rookie though.     

With the rebuilding project underway there is no reason to rush both
Cecil and Drabek.  However, their contributions this season could be
‘key’ to the Jays 2010 season, although it is a bit of stretch to count
on rookies emerging in dramatic fashion.

It is also a bit of a stretch to count on players coming off the injuries to emerge.  Dustin McGowan and Jesse Litsch
are both wildcards at this point.  We may see them not pitch at all
this year?  McGowan had a serious injury, and it is a terrible shame because of
his talent level.  Litsch doesn’t have the stuff to be a top 3 starter in my
opinion, but I hope he proves me wrong.  I’m counting more on the
contributions of Drabek and Cecil as possible ‘keys to the season’ … and the future for that matter!

3.  Team Defense

The Jays lost Scott Rolen at third base, we picked up a decent
defensive shortstop Alex Gonzolez, stayed similar defensively at
catcher acquiring John Buck to replace Rod Barajas and got a little weaker in the outfield losing Alex Rios.  The Jays outfield will now have Jose Bautista
Bautista intrigues me because I want to see how much ground he can cover in the outfield.  Bautista’s arm is also well above-average.  I look
for him to step-up and be a key contributor to the team defense.  With Adam Lind and Travis Snider possibly occuping the other corner
outfield spot, it could get ugly.  Also Edwin Encarncion at third base is a very risky option.  The Jays will need to play good ‘team defense,’ as they look to be deteriorating in that respect.

Conclusion

If all these things fall into place, the Jays will have a very good
year.  If they don’t?  And you will notice that I don’t expect all them
to actually happen.  The Jays will – as every baseball preview predicts
– submit this season to rebuilding and likely end up in the ‘cellar’ of
the A.L. East.  Notice how I used the word ‘cellar.’  Cellar are often opened by keys … ha ha.  Yep, I’m a cornball.

Even though this year looks bleak Blue Jay fans, it will be entertaining to look out for my:

Keys to the Season”   

JaysKeys copy.jpg 

                            

 

              

Just When I Doubted Him …. Doubt him UNCONFIRMED as yet

First of all, I want to apologize to young Jays GM, Alex Anthopolous, for reiterating some of the criticism that has been thrown his way in the offseason.  Anthopolous is making HIS moves.  Put simply, he is doing what he feels needs to done in order to build the Jays from the ground up.  Who am I to say that he is making too many low-risk decisions that resemble the former GM J.P. Ricciardi? 

I really hope Brett Wallace proves the critics wrong. 

A funny thing happened last week.  It was as if I woke up something in Alex Anthopolous by my last post?  AA did something totally beyond what the former management would have done.  He took a risk!  An exciting risk on one of the top international baseball prosects.  The Jays signed supposedly 19-year-old Cuban infield prospect Adeiny Hechevarria to aHechevarria copy.jpg 4-year-deal worth 10 million dollars.  Even though the Yankees aggressively pursued Hechevarria, and reportedly offered him more money, the Jays scooped him up.  The young man expects to move quickly up the ladder in the Jays organization – something that he felt could not be achieved in New York.  

One scout calls Hechevarria the next Alfonso Soriano, another says that he is more of fielder than a hitter, and then one more scout believes that he eventually be an outfielder.  Regardless, Alex Anthopolous is taking a necessary risk in this signing!  I like it!  Acquiring a young infielder fills a void in our organization, and even if it doesn’t work out, you can tell that AA’s mind is in the right place. 

He is slinging the guns!  Risking money on a young player than can potentially pay ‘HUGE 5-catergory’ dividends!  With this move, AA countered the exact thing that I wrote about last week.  Using Baseball Prospectus’ evaluation of the Taylor/Wallace trade to comment on how AA dealt a high-reward prospect, Michael Taylor, for a low-reward, one-dimensional guy in Wallace.  Hechevarria is definitely the ‘high-risk, high-reward’ move that Blue Jays were looking for, and Baseball Prospcetus was expecting.  

Hechevarria will likely start the year in AA New Hampshire – an indication that the Jays will REALLY move the guy along.  This move has the whole Blue Jay nation up in excitement!

Quite frankly, I see it as ‘baseballs out‘ move!  As soon as 2012, the Jays will be ready to throw em?  Yankees, Rays, Red Sox, Orioles if you want to throw down in fisticuffs, fine. I’ve got Mr. Jack Johnson and Dr. Tom O’Leary waiting for ya, right here.  < (Anchorman)      

AA Faces Trouble Right Out the Gate

All right!  Time to get serious about this season, and Jays in the future.  Reading ‘Baseball Prospectus‘ I see that Jays GM Alex Anthopolous is already facing critics.  Here is a little background on Anthoupolous, and the situation he faces for the upcoming season.

Walrus.jpg    

At the end of 2009 the Toronto Blue Jays went
the route of choosing a young, and up-and-coming General Manager, Alex
Anthopolous
. Among Blue Jay faithful, Anthopolous is beginning to
become known as ‘AA’ out of conveinence for his large name.

AA took over the job in October of 2009 after working as an Assistant
GM apprentice to the J.P. Ricciardi for four years. Before that, AA had
been with the Montreal Expos and the Blue Jays as a scouting
coordinator since 2000.

AA is great young sucess story graduating from my Alma-matar,
McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, with an Economics Degree. At
23, he decided to pursue a career in the game. He became proactive,
calling organizations and looking for any way to get a foot in the
door. Finally, after getting a direct line to Expo GM Jim Beattie’s
office in Florida, he got his chance. Starstuck, AA says that he hung
up on Beattie the first time he called.

In his short time as GM, AA has inherited a team with many problems
seeking an innate desire to rebuild. Right from the beginning, it was
clear that AA had a new agenda than the previous GM that was said to
have ‘reign’ over all Front Office decisions. J.P. Ricciardi cut Blue
Jay scouting, and AA’s first instinct was to expand it, possibly
looking to go after ‘gem’ high-school prep players that the previous GM
was reluctant to take the risk on. Over Ricciardi’s tenure, he drafted
low-risk, low-reward college prospects that didn’t completely fail
(finding guys like Aaron Hill, Adam Lind and Ricky Romero) but they
were enough to deplete the depth in the Blue Jay’s farm system to where
they were rated #28 system in baseball.

The appease the public, and address this need, AA showed a committment
changing this by expanding the scouting staff and trading the Jay’s
most valuable commodity, Roy Halladay, for three top-level prospects
that instantly boosted the rating of the Jays system.

The rebuilding that every Jays fan is looking for has seemingly been
initiated with these moves. However, reading the recent issue of Baseball Prospectus
they consider the trading of top prospect Michael Taylor to the Oakland
Athletics for A’s top prospect Brett Wallace a fatal mistake by AA.
Baseball Prospectus evaluated Taylor as a player with much more
naturally gift skill, and having a higher-ceiling.

Wallace, a low-risk college phenonom at Arizona State, was ripped by
Baseball Prospectus for his athletic ability and they made fun of the
way scouts mocking called him ‘Walrus Boy.’ The Jays have notoriously
been critisized for showing a tendancy to disregard building their team
around speed and defense. Trading Taylor for Wallace only fuelled this
debate among Blue Jay faithful.

The current do not have a legitimate leadoff hitter, they have two slow
outfielders that have trouble making plays in the gap (Travis Snider
and Adam Lind) and third baseman with notorious defensive problems
(Edwin Encarnacion). Taylor, with speed and outfield range, would have
been able solve two of those problems. Instead, the Jays saw fit to get
a player that REALLY needs to ‘mash’ in order to play first base in
MLB.

Altogether, AA has been critisized and commended for his initial
dealings with the Jays rebuilding plan. He continues build from within
while cutting payroll and improving his chance to reap the benefits
young players. It is the way in which he is doing it, which has been
critisized.

Personally, I tend to agree with Baseball Prospectus. Taylor would have
been the option with more potential. However, looking at the Jays
current first base situation, they could use help in the area. Teiexia,
Youkilus, Pena and Atkins are what the Jays are up against at first
base. They haven’t had that ‘jumpstart’ in the middle of the order from
that position. I see both sides here, but I’m also skepitcal about how
Wallace with be able to hit, or field even considering his frame. I
believe, this deal could definitely backfire HUGE in AA face!

Do you agree Billy Beane swindled the Jays by acquiring Taylor for Wallace?

Does AA deserve to be ‘ripped on’ for the ‘Taylor/Wallace deal?

How important is it to have athletes on your team, as opposed to players that can ‘mash’?

WeLikeRoyWeLikeRoy

The Roy Halladay blockbuster trade to the Phillies a couple months ago has recently brought this blog, my screen name, my life and Toronto Blue Jays into an identity crisis

First of all, there is no way that I am changing my ‘welikeroywelikeroy‘ screen name!  ‘The Simpsons‘ reference coupled with my favorite all-time player’s name is just too good to let goGoodmam.jpg of. 

For those of you that don’t watch ‘The Simpsons,’ there is an episode where a motivation speaker, Brad Goodman, is intrigued by Bart Simpson’s attitude towards life.  Goodman gets the people of Springfield (the town where the Simpsons live) to chant in a motivational town hall meeting:  “‘Be like the Boy’ ‘Be like the Boy’.”  After that, Goodman gets just the ladies in the crowd to chant:  “Be like the Boy”, “Be like the Boy.”  Then Goodman asks the old people in the back of the crowd to do the same chant.  Hilariously, the old people hard of hearing come up with:  “We Like Roy, We Like Roy.”

Combined with Halladay being my favorite player, this was naturally one of the best screen names that I’ve ever thought of, in my opinion.  I even tried to get that chant going at a couple of Blue Jay games, but it never caught on.  This is the gift that I give to you City of Philadelphia!  Make the ‘We Like Roy’ chant work!   

I’ve come to realization that I will always be a HUGE Halladay fan, no matter where he goes!  And to prove this fact, without completly destroying my identity as a life-long ‘die hard’ Blue Jay fan, I’ve taken a drastic step.

 
DSC01037.JPG
 

DSC01036.JPG

That is right!  I got a Roy Halladay Phillies jersey, and I wear it proudly, not even being a Phillies fan.  Call me a traitor all you like, but I still wear my Halladay Blue Jay jersey just as proudly.  Having this jersey is a statement that I realize the economics/business of baseball, and I have accepted it.  Halladay wanted to get paid, and go to a winner.  As long as that doesn’t come at the Blue Jays expense, I accept it, and embrace it.  From now on, I am a serious Phillies fan when Halladay is pitching.  I will be skipping Jay games to see Halladay starts!  That is a bold statement for me, but in figuring my ‘identity crisis,’ the loyalty I have towards Halladay partially trumped my loyalty towards the Jays.  It had an impact, is all I am saying.  My personal ‘Blue Jay world’ was devastated by some kind of natural disaster when the Halladay trade went through … to use a terribly timed metaphor.

The Jays Future Identity        

In losing Halladay, the Jays have lost their one definable ‘star player’ that all MLB fans,
teams and media were aware of.  We now look on to a much younger team
that has wide array of possibly emerging talent.  It is hard to say who will be the ‘marquee’ Blue Jay moving forward.  Aaron Hill and Adam Lind
would be the likely candidates, but we all know a ‘marquee’ player is
not given that moniker after only one ‘all-star caliber’ year.  It
takes time and consistant success.  Halladay gave the Jays many
‘all-star caliber’ years.  So, who will step into Halladay’s old
shoes?  Other than Lind and Hill, the Jays have some intriguing young
players that could be future All-Stars?  However, I’m not comfortable
enough to definably predict any of them as that.  Brett Wallace, Travis
Snider, Kyle Drabek, Zach Stewart, Shaun Marcum, Dustin McGowan, Ricky
Romero, Brett Cecil and Brandon Morrow
are the guys in the
organization that I could possibly see being future All-Stars.  If any
two of these guys actually turn into an all-star, the Jays will have a
promising future.  That said, nobody can replace ‘the Doc,’ but it will
be interesting to see what player(s) round out the Blue Jay ‘identity‘ for years to come.

In Closing: My Life

In closing, uncertain in life as I look for steady employment, figuring out my baseball allegiance had to be cleared up before appling to more jobs.  I was lost.  My life usually follows the condition of the Blue Jays franchise in some eerie way.  You’d have to talk to me for examples. 

Right now, the Jays and I are both searching for an identity.  Hear is hoping that we both hope find our identity moving forward.     

MATT HOLLIDAY!!!!! Man, Halladay is a different story

In case you were wondering about the over use of CAPS and the exclaimation marks, Matt Holliday was traded to the St. Louis Cardinals today for promising thrid base prospect Brett Wallace.  What relevance does this have to a Toronto Blue Jay fan?? 

None whatsoever, but it stop some ill informed people from calling in to a Toronto sports radio station and asking, “Who did we get for him?”  Obviously confusing Holliday with Halladay.

There you have the Toronto baseball fan.  Always great comedy.  

I’m suddenly growing a very bleak outlook on the Jays future.  With or without Halladay that is.  Recanting on what I posted earlier, trading Halladay is not as BIG MISTAKE of a mistake as I put it earlier considering Halladay will likely leave in 2010 if he Jays aren’t competing.  I personally don’t see them competing in 2010, so we pretty much have to pull the trigger on this deal.  Extremely sad to say, but true.  A bitter, bitter truth that is.  I would have liked them to hold onto the Doctor for that year, but now that all this has started in the media – there in no turning back.  It is obvious that these trade rumours will not stop until a deal is done.   

Oh well, I missed my chance to see the Jays in the playoffs when I was 12 years old.  What I didn’t know is that I’d still be waiting till I was 27 to see it happen!  With Halladay being traded, no doubt that I’ll be waiting past my 30th birthday to see October baseball again in Toronto.

Wasn’t it untill last year that the Yankees lost the A.L. East for the first time in 13 years???  Awwwww … poor babies!!!  

Should have played this whole thing cooler J.P.  That is all I have to say to him.  

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